Services :: Children's Speech Therapy Services

Children's Speech Language Therapy Services

Pediatric Speech and Language Evaluation and Treatment for:

APRAXIA OF SPEECH
a speech sound disorder that affects an individuals ability to initiate speech: to sequence and say sounds, syllables, or words consistently; and/or use appropriate syllable stress in speech. The problem is not due to muscle weakness or paralysis, but rather the brains ability to plan movements of the articulators (lips, tongue, jaw) needed for speech.

ARTICULATION DISORDER
difficulty forming and combining sounds when speaking. Typical speech production problems include substituting one sound for another (wabit for rabbit, thip for sip), omitting sounds (co for coat) or syllables (tephone for telephone), or distorting sounds.

ASPERGER'S SYNDROME
a milder form of autism and characterized by difficulties with social communication.

AUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDER (APD)
auditory processing is a term used to describe what happens when your brain recognizes and interprets the sounds around you. Children with APD often do not recognize subtle differences between sounds in words, even though the sounds themselves are loud and clear. For example, the request Tell me how a chair and a couch are alike may sound to a child with APD like tell me how a couch and a chair are alike. It can even be understood by the child as Tell me how a cow and a hair are alike. These kinds of problems are more likely to occur when a person with APD is in a noisy environment.

AUTISM
a developmental disorder affecting a childs ability to communicate and engage with others, starting before the age of three.

DYSARTHRIA
slurred or imprecise speech resulting from muscle weakness associated with underlying neurological injury.

FLUENCY DISORDER OR STUTTERING
an interruption in the flow of rhythm of speech characterized by hesitations, repetitions, or prolongations of sounds, syllables, words or phrases. Most often, stuttering begins in children ages 2 to 6 years who are first learning to speak. It may go away by itself or can last a lifetime. The chances of recovery are best when treated at an early age.

LANGUAGE DISORDERS
a problem in the understanding and/or formation of spoken or written language which may involve errors in word meaning, word endings, word order or word usage.

PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS PROBLEMS
the inability to learn the underlying skills needed in order to learn to read and spell.

PRAGMATIC/SOCIAL LANGUAGE DISORDERS
difficulty making eye contact, engaging in social exchanges and reading social cues. May be associated with Autism or Asperger's Syndrome.

SELECTIVE MUTISM
a unique childhood communication disorder whereby a child who is capable of speaking is unable to speak in given situations. For example, a child may be completely silent at school, for years at a time, but speak quite freely or even excessively at home.

TONGUE THRUSTING
an incorrect swallowing pattern where the tongue moves forward during swallowing or speaking, resulting in problems with occlusion of the teeth and/or articulation.

VOICE DISORDER
a problem characterized by poor voice quality (hoarse, harsh, breathy or nasal speech), inappropriate pitch (too high, too low, never changing, or interrupted by breaks), or inappropriate loudness (too loud or too soft).